Eric Knowles

Eric D. Knowles


Assistant Professor of Psychology



Visit the Politics and Intergroup Relation Lab (PIRL)

People dedicate a great deal of conscious and unconscious thought to the groups they're in and the groups  they're not in. I study how such intergroup thought affects our behavior and attitudes --with a particular focus on political judgment. For instance, I'm conducting research examining the extents to which White Americans' political attitudes and behavior are driven by ingroup-focused concerns (e.g., racial identity), outgroup-focused concerns (e.g., prejudice against non-Whites), or ostensibly group-neutral ideology (e.g., conservatism). I also have active interests in religious-group prejudice, interracial interaction, and the interplay of intergroup thinking and Theory of Mind.



Selected Publications



Privilege and Policy Attitudes

Knowles, E. D., Lowery, B. S., Chow, R. M., & Unzueta, M. M. (2014). Deny, distance, or dismantle? How White Americans manage a privileged racial identity. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 9, 594-609. doi: 10.1177/1745691614554658

Knowles, E. D., & Lowery, B. S. (2012). Meritocracy, self-concerns, and Whites’ denial of racial inequity. Self and Identity, 11, 202–222. doi:10.1080/15298868.2010.542015

Unzueta, M. M., Knowles, E. D., & Ho, G. (2012). Diversity is what you want it to be: How social-dominance motives affect construals of diversity. Psychological Science, 23, 303–309. doi:10.1177/095679761142672

Lowery, B. S., Chow, R. M., Knowles, E. D., & Unzueta, M. M. (2012). Paying for positive group esteem: How inequity frames affect whites’ responses to redistributive policies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102, 323–336. doi:10.1037/a0024598

Knowles, E. D., Lowery, B. S., Hogan, C. M., & Chow, R. M. (2009). On the malleability of ideology: Motivated construals of color blindness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96, 857–869. doi:10.1037/a0013595

Unzueta, M. M., Lowery, B. S., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). How believing in affirmative action quotas protects White men’s self-esteem. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 105, 1–13. doi:10.1016/j.obhdp.2007.05.001

Chow, R. M., Lowery, B. S., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). The two faces of dominance: The differential effect of ingroup superiority and outgroup inferiority on dominant-group identity and group esteem. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 1073–1081. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2007.11.002

Lowery, B. S., Knowles, E. D., & Unzueta, M. M. (2007). Framing inequity safely: Whites’ motivated perceptions of racial privilege. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 1237–1250. doi:10.1177/0146167207303016

Lowery, B. S., Unzueta, M. M., Knowles, E. D., & Goff, P. A. (2006). Concern for the ingroup and opposition to affirmative action. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 961–974. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.90.6.961

Knowles, E. D., & Peng, K. (2005). White selves: Conceptualizing and measuring a dominant-group Identity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 223–241. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.89.2.223


Social Identity and Political Behavior

Frenda, S. J., Knowles, E. D., Saletan, W., & Loftus, E. F. (2013). False memories of fabricated political events. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 280–286. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2012.10.013

Knowles, E. D., Lowery, B. S., Shulman, E. P., & Schaumberg, R. L. (2013). Race, ideology, and the Tea Party: A longitudinal study. PLOS ONE, 8, e67110. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0067110

Knowles, E. D., & Ditto, P. H. (2012). Preference, principle, and political casuistry. In J. Hanson (Ed.), Ideology, psychology, and law (pp. 341–379). New York: Oxford University Press.

Knowles, E. D., Lowery, B. S., & Schaumberg, R. L. (2010). Racial prejudice predicts opposition to Obama and his health care reform plan. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 420–423. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2009.10.011

Knowles, E. D., Lowery, B. S., & Schaumberg, R. L. (2009). Anti-egalitarians for Obama? Group-dominance motivation and the Obama vote. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 965–969. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2009.05.005

Social Cognition in Group Contexts Glaser, J., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). Implicit motivation to control prejudice. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 164–172. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2007.01.002

Park, S. H., Glaser, J., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). Implicit motivation to control prejudice moderates the effect of cognitive depletion on unintended discrimination. Social Cognition, 26, 401–419. doi:10.1521/soco.2008.26.4.401

Tannenbaum, D., Valasek, C. J., Knowles, E. D., & Ditto, P. H. (2013). Incentivizing wellness in the workplace: Sticks (not carrots) send stigmatizing signals. Psychological Science, 24, 1512–22. doi:10.1177/0956797612474471

Cho, J. C., & Knowles, E. D. (2013). I’m like you and you're like me: Social projection and self-stereotyping both help explain self-other correspondence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 444–56. doi:10.1037/a0031017


Social Cognition in Group Contexts

Glaser, J., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). Implicit motivation to control prejudice. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 164–172. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2007.01.002

Park, S. H., Glaser, J., & Knowles, E. D. (2008). Implicit motivation to control prejudice moderates the effect of cognitive depletion on unintended discrimination. Social Cognition, 26, 401–419. doi:10.1521/soco.2008.26.4.401

Tannenbaum, D., Valasek, C. J., Knowles, E. D., & Ditto, P. H. (2013). Incentivizing wellness in the workplace: Sticks (not carrots) send stigmatizing signals. Psychological Science, 24, 1512–22. doi:10.1177/0956797612474471

Cho, J. C., & Knowles, E. D. (2013). I’m like you and you're like me: Social projection and self-stereotyping both help explain self-other correspondence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 444–56. doi:10.1037/a0031017



Contact

Eric D. Knowles
Assistant Professor of Psychology

New York University
6 Washington Place, Rm. 579
New York, NY 10003

eric.knowles@nyu.edu

Visit the Politics and Intergroup Relation Lab (PIRL)


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