Gwyneth Lewis

Post-Doctoral Fellow

Primarily, my research focuses on the spatio-temporal nature of brain responses involved in recognizing written and spoken words. My work seeks to integrate findings from MEG to inform and extend existing models of lexical access.

In previous work we identified correlations between neural responses and continuous variables indexing perceptual, acoustic, phonemic, and lexical stages of lexical access. Connecting embodied theories of word recognition with interaction-competition models of lexical access, we found that visual cortices participated in the recognition of spoken words ranging continuously in imageability (Lewis & Poeppel, 2014).

Recently we conducted an MEG study of conceptual relations to elucidate the role of the anterior temporal lobe in taxonomic (feature-based) processing and the role of the temporoparietal junction in thematic (function-based) processing. We found strong evidence of the ATL’s involvement in taxonomic relations, confirming predictions of its connections with feature-based representations. Our findings for the TPJ suggest a less specific role for thematic relations, but also provide a nuanced view of the connections and interactions between different kinds of concepts (Lewis, Poeppel, & Murphy, 2015).


Sample Publications

  1. Lewis, G., Poeppel, D., & Murphy, G. L. (2015). The neural bases of taxonomic and thematic conceptual relations: An MEG study. Neuropsychologia, 68, 176-189. [pdf]
  2. Lewis, G., & Poeppel, D. (2014). The role of visual representations during the lexical access of spoken words. Brain and Language, 134, 1-10. [pdf]
  3. Simon, D. A., Lewis, G., & Marantz, A. (2012). Disambiguating form and lexical frequency effects in MEG responses using homonyms. Language and Cognitive Processes, 27, 275-287. [pdf]
  4. Lewis, G., Solomyak, O., & Marantz, A. (2011). The neural basis of obligatory decomposition of suffixed words. Brain and Language, 118, 118-127. [pdf]

Contact:

email

References:

  1. Lewis, G., Poeppel, D., & Murphy, G. L. (2015). The neural bases of taxonomic and thematic conceptual relations: An MEG study. Neuropsychologia, 68, 176-189.
  2. Lewis, G., & Poeppel, D. (2014). The role of visual representations during the lexical access of spoken words. Brain and Language, 134, 1-10.