Associate Professor of Psychology
Social

Social Perception, Action & Motivation Lab

Research

I am interested in the conscious and nonconscious ways people fundamentally orient to the world. In particular, I focus on how the motivations, emotions, needs, and goals people hold impact the basic ways people perceive, interpret, and ultimately react to information around them. I advocate for an interactive cognitive system where psychological states constrain the basic manner in which we perceive and react to our worlds. My work, then, explores motivational biases in visual and social perception and the consequential effects for behavior and navigation of the social world. In doing so, my research represents an intersection among social psychology, judgment and decision-making, social cognition, and perception.

Biography

Education:

Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Cornell University (2006)
B.A. in psychology from the University of Nebraska at Kearney (2001)
B.F.A. in music performance from the University of Nebraska at Kearney (2001)

 

Positions:

Associate Professor of Psychology, New York University
Assistant Professor of Psychology, Ohio University (2006-2009)

 

Selected Publications

Kappes, H. B., Balcetis, E., & De Cremer, D. (in press). Motivated reasoning during recruitment. Journal of Applied Psychology.

Granot, Y., & Balcetis, E., Feigenson, N., & Tyler, T. R. (in press). In the eyes of the law: Perception versus reality in appraisals of video evidence. Psychology, Public Policy, and the Law.

Granot, Y., Stern, C., & Balcetis, E. (2017). Zip code of conduct: Crime rate affects legal punishment of police. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 3 (2), 176-186.

Alter, A. L., Stern, C., Granot, Y., & Balcetis, E. (2016). The “Bad Is Black” Effect: Why People Believe Evildoers Have Darker Skin Than Do-Gooders. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42(12), 1653-1665.

Balcetis, E., & Cole, S. (2016). Task demand not so damning: Improved techniques that mitigate demand in studies that support top-down effects. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 39, doi:10.1017/S0140525X15002538

Balcetis, E., Stern, C., & Cole, C. (2016). Perceiving systematically, not just differently: Calling for perceptual models with explanatory power. Psychological Inquiry, 27:4, 275-280.

Cole, S., Trope, Y., & Balcetis, E. (2016). In the eye of the betrothed: Perceptual downgrading of attractive alternative romantic partners. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Balcetis, E. (2016). Target Article: Approach and avoidance as organizing structures for motivated distance perception. Emotion Review, 8, 115-128.

Balcetis, E. (2016). Author reply: Future tests of motivated distance perception from multiple perspectives. Emotion Review, 8, 133-135.

Balcetis, E., & Cole, S. (2016). Motivating the action-in-perception hypothesis: Approach and avoidance motives as a process-model for action's effects on perception. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 1(5), 83-85.

Stern, C., Balcetis, E., Cole, S., West, T. V., & Caruso, E. (2016). Government instability shifts skin tone representations of and intentions to vote for political candidates. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 110, 76-95.

Balcetis, E., Cole, S., & Bisi, A. (2015). Near and nothing to it: Perceived proximity improves exercise by increasing feasibility appraisals. Motivation Science, 1, 204-218.

Cole, S., Riccio, M., & Balcetis, E. (2014). Focused and fired up: Narrowed attention produces perceived proximity and increases goal-relevant action. Motivation and Emotion, 38, 815–822.

Granot, Y., Balcetis, E., Schneider, K., & Tyler, T. (2014). Blind justice: The effects of group identification and visual attention on legal punishment decisions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 2196-2208.

Moskowitz, G. & Balcetis, E. (2014). The conscious roots of selfless, unconscious goals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37, 151.

Cole, S. & Balcetis, E. (2013). Sources of resources: Bioenergetic and psychoenergetic resources influence distance perception. Social Cognition, 31, 721-732.

Riccio, M., Cole, S., & Balcetis, E. (2013). Seeing the expected, the desired, and the feared: Influences on perceptual interpretation and directed attention. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7, 401-414.

Stern, C., Cole, S., Gollwitzer, P., Oettingen, G., & Balcetis, E. (2013). Effects of implementation intentions on anxiety, perceived proximity, and motor performance. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 39, 623-635.

Balcetis, E, Cole, S., Chelberg, M. B., & Alicke, M. (2013). Searching out the ideal: Awareness of ideal body standards predicts lower global self-esteem in women. Self and Identity, 12, 99-113.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2013). Considering the situation: Why people are better social psychologists than self-psychologists. Self and Identity, 12, 1-15. International Society for Self and Identity, Paper of the Year Award Winner

Cole, S., Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2013). Affective signals of threat increase perceived proximity. Psychological Science, 24, 34-40.

Cole, S., Balcetis, E., & Zhang, S. (2013). Visual perception and regulatory conflict: Motivation and physiology influence distance perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142, 18-22.

Dunning, D., & Balcetis, E. (2013). Wishing seeing. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 22, 33-37.

Balcetis, E., Cole, S., Chelberg, M. B., & Alicke, M. (2013). Searching out the ideal: Awareness of ideal body standards predicts lower global self-esteem in women. Self and Identity.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2013). Considering the situation: Why people are better social psychologists than self-psychologists. Self and Identity.
*Selected as the 2011 International Society for Self and Identity Best Paper

Cole, S., Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2013). Affective signals of threat produce perceived proximity. Psychological Science, 24, 34-40.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2012). A false-positive error in search of selective reporting: A refutation of Francis. i-Perception, 3, (3). http://i-perception.perceptionweb.com/ journal/I/volume/3/article/i0519ic

Cole, S., Balcetis, E., & Zhang, S. (2013). Visual perception and regulatory conflict: Motivation and physiology influence distance perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General,142, 18-22.

Dunning, D., & Balcetis, E. (in press). Wishful Seeing. Current Directions in Psychological Science.

Balcetis, E., Dunning, D., & Granot, Y. (2012). Subjective value determines initial dominance in binocular rivalry. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 122-129.

Zell, E., & Balcetis, E. (2012). The influence of social comparison on visual representation of one’s face. PLoS ONE 7, (5): e36742. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0036742

Alter, A., & Balcetis, E. (2011). Fondness makes the distance grow shorter: Desired locations seem closer because they seem more vivid. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 16-21.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2010). Wishful seeing: Desired objects are seen as closer. Psychological Science, 21, 147-152.

Balcetis, E., & Lassiter, G. D. (eds.) (2010). The social psychology of visual perception. Psychology Press, New York, NY.

Balcetis, E., & Cole, S. (2009). Body in mind: The role of embodied cognition in self-regulation. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 3, 1-16.

Balcetis, E. (2009). How a biased majority claim moral minority: Tracking eye movements to base rates in social predictions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 970-973.

Balcetis, E., Dunning, D., & Miller, R. (2008). Do collectivists “know themselves” better than individualists?: Cross-cultural studies of the “holier than thou” phenomenon. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 1252-1267.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2008). A mile in moccasins: How situational experience diminishes dispositionism in social inference. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 102-114.

Balcetis, E. (2007). Where the motivation resides and self-deception hides: How motivated cognition accomplishes self-deception. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 1, 1-21.

Balcetis, E., & Dale, R. (2007). Conceptual set as a top-down constraint on visual object identification. Perception, 36, 581-595.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2007). Cognitive dissonance reduction and perception of the physical world.Psychological Science, 18, 917-921.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2006). See what you want to see: Motivational influences on visual perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 612-625.

Balcetis, E., & Dunning, D. (2005). Judging for two: Some connectionist proposals for how the self informs and constrains social judgment. Invited chapter for M. Alicke, D. Dunning, & J. Krueger (Eds.), Self and social judgment. New York: Psychology Press.


Address

Emily Balcetis
Associate Professor of Psychology

Department of Psychology
New York University
6 Washington Place, Room 525
New York, NY 10003
Tel: (212) 998-3998
Fax: (212) 995-4966
Email: emilybalcetis@nyu.edu

 

Updated